MIT-led research team develops wound-healing solution with potential for human use

November 7, 2006

Cambridge, Mass.-Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Hong Kong have developed a biodegradable solution that can stop bleeding in wounded rodents within seconds.

Cambridge, Mass.-Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Hong Kong have developed a biodegradable solution that can stop bleeding in wounded rodents within seconds.

In their study, which was featured in the journal Nanomedicine, the researchers say the solution could help stabilize patients with a serious injury.

According to the study, when the solution-which contains peptides-is applied to open wounds, it forms a gel that seals the injury site. Once the injury heals, the gel breaks down into amino acids, which can be used by surrounding cells. The wound remains sealed even after the excess gel is removed, say the researchers. The researchers believe the peptides interact with the extracellular matrix surrounding the cells.

During the research, the solution was applied to several types of tissue-including brain, liver, skin, spinal cord and intestine-in the rodents. In almost every case, bleeding stopped immediately. According to the researchers, once perfected for human use the solution could reduce the time it takes to perform surgery by as much as 50 percent.