Chronic inflammatory skin diseases associated with increased shingles risk

September 8, 2020

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology reveals patients with chronic inflammatory skin diseases also have an increased risk for herpes zoster (shingles), which has the possibility to lead to extended hospitalizations.

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found various chronic inflammatory skin diseases (CISD), such as psoriasis, rosacea and atopic dermatitis, have the possibility to lead to an increased risk for herpes zoster (Hz), or commonly known as shingles, and hospitalization.

Initially reported by Drug Topics, the study’s authors examined data from the 2002-2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample and discovered hospitalizations for shingles was also frequently linked to various CISDs, and also found these patients endured a longer hospitalization period.1

“Nearly one in three people in the US will develop herpes zoster in their lifetime, with approximately 1 million cases annually and a 3% hospitalization rate,” the study authors wrote. “Patients with chronic inflammatory skin diseases have potential risk factors for HZ, including long-term use of systematic immunosuppressants and immune dysregulation in the skin and periphery.”

More information and full results of the study can be found at www.drugtopics.com.

References:

1. Longware Duff, B. (2020, September 3). Chronic Inflammatory Skin Diseases and Shingles Risk. Retrieved September 09, 2020, from https://www.drugtopics.com/view/chronic-inflammatory-skin-diseases-and-shingles-risk