FDA delays new sunscreen labeling rules

May 16, 2012

The Food and Drug Administration has delayed for six months regulations that would require sunscreen makers to change product labels to more clearly state how much protection they offer from the sun.

Washington - The Food and Drug Administration has delayed for six months regulations that would require sunscreen makers to change product labels to more clearly state how much protection they offer from the sun.

In June 2011, the FDA announced that by summer 2012, most broad-spectrum products with an SPF of 15 or greater would have to include on their labels statements advising that the products would help to prevent sunburn, skin cancer and skin aging when used regularly with other sun-protective measures. The products also would not be permitted to claim to be waterproof or sweatproof.

Late last week, the FDA said would delay the sunscreen regulations for six months, giving manufacturers more time to make the labeling changes, CBS News reports.

U.S. Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.) on May 11 released a statement criticizing the FDA’s decision to delay implementing the regulations.

“For too long the FDA has allowed manufacturers to get away with inaccurate claims about sun protection,” Sen. Reed said in the statement. “The FDA has been considering regulations to restrict these claims since 1978. It is time for them to stop dragging their feet and put the new sunscreen safety and labeling standards into effect.”

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