Biologics linked to lower CV disease rates

October 3, 2012

Patients with severe psoriasis who were treated systemically with biologic agents or methotrexate had a lower combined risk of death, myocardial infarction and stroke, according to the results of a recent study.

Gentofte, Denmark - Patients with severe psoriasis who were treated systemically with biologic agents or methotrexate had a lower combined risk of death, myocardial infarction and stroke, according to the results of a recent study.

The study, led by researchers with Copenhagen University Hospital, focused on the rate of cardiovascular disease events in patients with severe psoriasis who were using systemic anti-inflammatory drugs, including biological agents, methotrexate, retinoids, cyclosporine and phototherapy.

Examining data from 2,400 patients pooled from nationwide administrative databases, investigators identified 693 patients who had been treated with biologic agents and 799 who had been treated with methotrexate. Overall incidence rates per 1,000 patient years was 6.0, 17.3 and 44.5 for patients treated with biologic agents, methotrexate, and other therapies, respectively.

“In this nationwide study of patients with severe psoriasis, systemic anti-inflammatory treatment with biological agents or methotrexate was associated with lower cardiovascular disease event rates compared to patients treated with other anti-psoriatic therapies,” the study authors concluded.

The findings were published online Sept. 11 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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