Study: TPF50 outperforms other sunscreens

March 12, 2014

A new study suggests that triple protection factor broad-spectrum sunscreen 50 (TPF50) is more effective than traditional sunscreens in preventing sun damage to the skin and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

 

A new study suggests that triple protection factor broad-spectrum sunscreen 50 (TPF50) is more effective than traditional sunscreens in preventing sun damage to the skin and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

Similar to more traditional sunscreens, TPF50 is applied topically and contains a physical SPF 50 sunscreen. It also features liposome-encapsulated DNA repair enzymes complex, and a combination of the antioxidants carnosine, arazine and ergothionine.

The researchers -Enzo Emanuele, M.D., University of Pavia, Italy; James M. Spencer, M.D., Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York; and Martin Braun, M.D., Vancouver, British Columbia - tested TPF50 against topical DNA repair and antioxidant and growth factor treatments.

“Specifically, we assessed the ability of TFP50 versus those of DNA repair and antioxidant and growth factor topical products used with SPF 50 sunscreens in preventing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers (CPD), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) and protein carbonylation (PC) formation in human skin biopsies after experimental irradiations,” study authors wrote. “In head-to-head comparison studies, TPF50 showed the best efficacy in reducing all of the three molecular markers. The results indicated that the three TPF50 components had a synergistic effect in reducing CPD and PC, but not 8OHdG. Taken together, our results indicate that TPF50 improves the genomic and proteomic integrity of skin cells after repeated exposure to UVR.”

The study concludes that TPF50 was the most effective in reducing molecular markers indicating possible cancerous lesions. The study also showed that TPF50 improved genomic and proteomic integrity of skin cells after UVR damage, reducing the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer and aesthetic damage to the skin.

Study findings were published in the March issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.