Human embryonic fibroblast stem cells improve photodamaged skin

October 1, 2010

Growth factors that are developed via human fibroblast stem cells hold the promise of skin rejuvenation without presenting risks of toxicity or infection, according to an assistant professor of clinical medicine and dermatology at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.

Key Points

Seattle - Growth factors that are developed via human fibroblast stem cells hold the promise of skin rejuvenation without presenting risks of toxicity or infection, according to an assistant professor of clinical medicine and dermatology at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.

Human embryonic fibroblast stem cells are pluripotent cell lines that are grown in the laboratory. The fibroblasts are then capable of producing a variety of substances (proteins) that include collagen, various growth factors, etc., according to William Philip Werschler, M.D., F.A.A.D., F.A.A.C.S.

Dr. Werschler contrasts this process that generates physiologically balanced growth factors to the commercial production of one particular growth factor, which may be manufactured for specific targets such as the up- or downregulation of particular tissue types, including vascular, muscle, collagen and so forth. The difference is one of physiologically balanced natural levels versus pharmacologic doses, as the physiologically balanced growth factors affect the processes of healing and/or treatment.

"What results is a slurry of growth factors that replicate the natural physiology of the body, which are referred to as physiologically balanced growth factors," he says.