State of the AAD: Academy to help members fulfill D-MOC requirements

May 01, 2008, 4:00am

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) is working to help members fulfill maintenance of certification requirements, President C. William Hanke, M.D., M.P.H., says.

Key Points

Kapalua, Hawaii - The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) is working to help members fulfill maintenance of certification requirements, President C. William Hanke, M.D., M.P.H., says.

Dr. Hanke addressed colleagues at the Winter Clinical Dermatology Conference on Maui, outlining current AAD initiatives now under way.

He says the academy is developing learning research tools, especially for dermatology maintenance of certification (D-MOC).

The AAD is developing a Maintenance of Certification Manual for Dermatology and will provide ongoing education central to D-MOC, including CME activities, self-assessment programs and exam preparation support, he says.

Educational programs

The academy now offers a number of regional educational courses, in addition to its annual winter and summer meetings, says Dr. Hanke, visiting professor of dermatology, University of Iowa-Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City.

Coming events include a course on practical approaches to patient problems (August 2008, Chicago) and a dermatology review (November 2008, Scottsdale, Ariz.).

The academy also is expanding its Dermatology Advocacy Network ( http://www.aad.org/DAN/).

"This is meant to rejuvenate the grass roots side of dermatology," Dr. Hanke says.

DAN members participate in conference calls and receive monthly newsletters to keep them abreast of important legislative and regulatory issues affecting the specialty.

Dr. Hanke encourages all members to become involved.

"We have a large legislative conference in the fall and have for many years," he says. "This year we want to ... have a stronger message."

AAD supports special "fly-ins" to Washington, D.C., when hot legislative topics are on the congressional agenda, and collaborates with state societies on issues such as scope of practice and indoor tanning.

Use of extenders

According to Dr. Hanke, 29 percent of dermatology practices currently use physician extenders. Another 12 percent are currently hiring extenders, and 7 percent plan to hire extenders in the next three years.

The academy has established a policy regarding the use of extenders and is considering the need for further extender education.

A course for extenders was offered for the first time at the annual meeting in San Antonio.

The proper use of extenders is debated by state legislatures and licensing boards. AAD is monitoring bills under consideration and weighing in as appropriate.

"One of the goals for the future for me is for me to be on the Indiana State Medical Board," Dr. Hanke says.

"We have to have a presence in these areas if we want to impact things," he says.