Radiofrequency for noninvasive body contouring turns up the heat for results

June 1, 2011

Among the various aesthetic device technologies used to treat skin laxity, cellulite and achieve circumference reduction, radiofrequency (RF) appears to be one of the most efficacious energy sources currently available.

Key Points

Yokneam Illit, Israel - Among the various aesthetic device technologies used to treat skin laxity, cellulite and achieve circumference reduction, radiofrequency (RF) appears to be one of the most efficacious energy sources currently available.

The VelaShape II (Syneron) uses high-powered bipolar RF technology that can achieve these cosmetic goals. Here, a higher energy output appears to be the key to better treatment outcomes.

The VelaShape II device combines four different technologies including RF, IR (infrared), vacuum and mechanical tissue manipulation using massage rollers. According to Ruthie Amir, M.D., the combination of these technologies is unique to aesthetic devices, and their combination along with the higher RF output result in neocollagenesis and an increase in circulation and lymphatic drainage in the targeted area, she says.

As all other aesthetic device manufacturers, Syneron and its technologies have undergone changes. Operating at 25 watts, the original VelaSmooth is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the improvement of cellulite. Operating at 50 watts, the VelaShape is FDA-approved for circumference reduction (such as around the thighs) but is used off-label for the abdomen, submental area and arms.

However, further raising the RF energy output in the VelaShape II to 65 watts appears to be the most effective approach in achieving the best aesthetic outcomes such as for fat and circumference reduction, Dr. Amir says.

"Since the reduction in adipose tissue volume is temperature dependent, and because the bipolar RF power seems to be the major contributor for tissue heating, we found that increasing the RF power up to 65 watts can significantly enhance treatment efficiency," says Dr. Amir, who is director of clinical research, Syneron Medical, Yokneam Illit, Israel.