Study shows effectiveness of golimumab in treating psoriatic arthritis

December 4, 2007

Boston - Results of what is reportedly the largest phase 3 study ever conducted with a biologic treatment suggest that patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) achieve significant, sustained improvements in joint and skin manifestations of the disease after monthly subcutaneous injections of investigative golimumab, DocGuide.com reports.

Boston - Results of what is reportedly the largest phase 3 study ever conducted with a biologic treatment suggest that patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) achieve significant, sustained improvements in joint and skin manifestations of the disease after monthly subcutaneous injections of investigative golimumab, DocGuide.com reports.

The findings were presented here in November at a meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). Among the findings were that more than 30 percent of subjects in two golimumab-dosing groups achieved a score of 90 on the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index.

According to presenter and lead author Philip Mease, M.D., chief of clinical research at Seattle’s Swedish Hospital Medical Center, investigators randomized 405 adult PsA patients with at least three swollen and tender joints to receive subcutaneous injections of either placebo or golimumab (50 mg or 100 mg) at the first treatment, and in weeks four, eight, 12, 16 and 20.

Subjects who responded inadequately by week 16 were switched to golimumab 50 mg (placebo patients) or golimumab 100 mg (all golimumab patients).

At week 14, 51 percent of the golimumab 50 mg subjects and 45 percent of the 100 mg subjects had achieved at least an ACR20, as compared with 9 percent of placebo patients. Through week 24, golimumab subjects achieved sustained, significant improvements in skin and nail manifestations of the disease.

The golimumab was well-tolerated, according to the study, and there were no drug-related opportunistic infections.

Related Content:

News