Peanut allergy linked to sensitization through skin

April 1, 2008

Philadelphia - The mechanism leading to the development of peanut allergy and a potential desensitization treatment for peanut-allergic individuals were among the study findings presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) Annual Meeting held here in March, HealthDay News reports.

Philadelphia - The mechanism leading to the development of peanut allergy and a potential desensitization treatment for peanut-allergic individuals were among the study findings presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) Annual Meeting held here in March, HealthDay News reports.

Researchers from London’s King’s College used skin and gastrointestinal homing-memory T-cell markers to explore the mechanism by which individuals become sensitized to peanuts. The researchers suggest that sensitization to peanuts through the skin may predispose some people to the development of peanut allergy.

Reporting on another study, researchers from Duke University discussed their investigation into whether peanut oral immunotherapy could be used to desensitize peanut-allergic children to peanut protein.

The researchers treated 13 peanut-allergic children with a three-phase course of peanut oral immunotherapy, followed by an open food challenge of peanut flour. Eight patients had no symptoms in response to the food challenge; the other five experienced mild allergic symptoms.

HealthDay News reports that the Duke University study suggests peanut oral immunotherapy is both safe and effective for peanut-allergic patients, and that the study’s immunologic findings for peanut oral immunotherapy are similar to what the researchers found for other forms of oral immunotherapy.