Hair removal device no more effective than shaving

June 10, 2013

A home-use hair removal device was no better than shaving in terms of improving hair density and reducing the hair regrowth rate, results of a study demonstrated.

 

A home-use hair removal device was no better than shaving in terms of improving hair density and reducing the hair regrowth rate, results of a study demonstrated.

Researchers with Nashville Centre for Laser and Facial Surgery and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn., examined high-resolution photographs that were taken at baseline, once a week during treatment and monthly during post-treatment follow-up, according to the study abstract. Investigators used microtattoos to ensure photographs and treatments were made in accurate anatomical locations. The active and control sites on participants were shaved prior to baseline and were allowed to regrow prior to the first treatment.

The shaving group had a mean baseline count of 79.4, which was stable during the eight-week treatment phase. After stopping treatment, it climbed to 98.8, 100.1 and 104.6 at months one, two and three post-treatment, respectively.

The active group (the no!no! hot wire device) showed a mean baseline count of 86.0 which climbed to 104.0, 106.4 and 109.0 at one, two and three months post-treatment, respectively. During the treatment phase, shaving proved to be slightly more effective at removing hair than the hot wire device with weak statistical significance (P<0.05 at five of seven time points). Shaving and the hot wire device were statistically indistinguishable at one, two and three months.

“In terms of hair characteristics, no difference in hair color or hair thickness was seen between the shaving control and the hot-wire sites in the treatment or follow-up period,” the study authors noted. “We conclude that the hot-wire device does not offer any benefit as compared to shaving.”

The study results were published online June 5 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.