Genetic 'master regulator' in skin formation identified

April 7, 2009

Corvallis, Ore. ? Oregon State University researchers have discovered a gene in humans that appears to be a master regulator in skin formation, which could shed light on everything from psoriasis to aging skin, according to a University press release.

Corvallis, Ore.

- Oregon State University researchers have discovered a gene in humans that appears to be a master regulator in skin formation, which could shed light on everything from psoriasis to aging skin, according to a university press release.

Inadequate or loss of expression of the gene, called CTIP2, may play a role in some skin disorders. The gene appears to be a crucial factor in the different levels of skin development, including protective barrier formation, and it plays an important role in lipid biosynthesis, which is relevant in both skin disease and premature skin aging, a researcher said.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, which has provided $1.5 million for continued research. The study was published in the

Journal of Investigative Dermatology

.

Researchers say understanding skin genetics more completely might allow a more scientific stimulation of gene expression with botanical extracts and other compounds in order to rejuvenate skin more scientifically, effectively and permanently.

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