Study shows why some tumors spread

December 2, 2008

Short Headline: Why tumors spread Chicago ? Researchers have found that when a fragment of ribonucleic acid, microRNA-101, is missing, a protein called EZH2 starts to proliferate, shutting down other genes that keep cancer in check, Reuters reports.

Chicago - Researchers have found that when a fragment of ribonucleic acid, microRNA-101, is missing, a protein called EZH2 starts to proliferate, shutting down other genes that keep cancer in check, Reuters reports.
EZH2 has been linked with aggressive forms of breast, prostate, skin and bladder cancer, and researchers say microRNA-101 is what keeps EZH2 from overproducing in cells.
For the study, published in the journal Science, the team introduced microRNA-101 into tumors in mice with high levels of EZH2. They found that the levels of EZH2 fell, and tumor growth slowed.
This information could be useful to patients in two ways, researchers say. EZH2 levels could serve as a biomarker, and the research could lead to new therapies to restore microRNA-101 as a natural defense against the spread of cancer.