Body contouring devices can boost revenue, but may cost you

March 4, 2020

New York city cosmetic dermatologist Michele Green, M.D., says having a muscle stimulating device can boost a practice’s bottom line but that’s not a given.

New York city cosmetic dermatologist Michele Green, M.D., says having a muscle stimulating device can boost a practice’s bottom line but that’s not a given.

READ MORE: We asked several aesthetic physicians to share what they’ve learned about body toning technologies and more.

“The HIFEM magnetic field technology (electromagnetic energy) is similar to that of an MRI machine,” she says. “Having Emsculpt as a part of your treatment offerings can boost a practice’s revenue, as patient’s need approximately four treatments two to three days apart. The cost per treatment ranges from $750 to $1000 per treatment area. In addition, treatment can be done by a trained technician under the supervision of the physician.”

Cooltone, uses magnetic muscle stimulation to penetrate deep into the muscle layers, but Cooltone is only FDA approved for the abdomen, thigh and buttock area, according to Dr. Green.

“Emsculpt is the gold standard body sculpting device. It is FDA approved to treat the calves, biceps, triceps, abdomen and buttocks areas with good results,” she says.

One thing for practices to think about before taking the body toning device plunge is that the overall body sculpting market is saturated. Medspas offer services in this category at prices that can make it hard for physicians to compete, according to Dr. Green.

And these machines are expensive to maintain. While Dr. Green says the Emsculpt doesn’t use consumables, practices pay $10,000 to change the applicator pads after 300 to 450 treatments.

READ MORE: Body toning devices offer benefits beyond aesthetics

“The deciding factor is the open-ended question of ongoing maintenance treatments and how many treatments are needed after the initial treatment on an ongoing basis. Also, there are no studies that have been published analyzing the long-term efficacy of the treatments,” she says.

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Dr. Green reports no conflicts of interest.