What’s old is new: Microneedling

Nov 09, 2016, 5:00am

Microneedling techniques are mimicking results often associated with laser treatment, according to Tina S. Alster, M.D., director of Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, who presented “Will Microneedling Replace Lasers?” at the 2016 American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) annual meeting in New Orleans.

Tina S. Alster, MDWhat is old is new, again. Microneedling techniques have been updated and improved upon, from “roller-type” devices to individual disposable, stainless-steel, multi-needled tips that provide enhanced clinical results. 

Microneedling techniques are mimicking results often associated with laser treatment, according to Tina S. Alster, M.D., director of Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, who presented “Will Microneedling Replace Lasers?” today at the 2016 American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) annual meeting in New Orleans. Dr. Alster, clinical professor of dermatology at Georgetown University Hospital, presented on the topic as part of a larger panel discussion, “ASDS Unplugged – Straight Talk about Devices and More.”

During the “straight-up” discussion, promising no frills or distortions on topics important to dermatologic surgeons, Dr. Alster reports microneedling is already replacing fractionated lasers or is being used in conjunction with lasers for several conditions. Those are: Perioral rhytides, in lieu of ablative and nonablative fractionated lasers; enlarged facial pores, in lieu of ablative and nonablative fractionated lasers; various scars (from acne, trauma, surgery), alone or in conjunction with pulsed dye laser treatment (if scars are erythematous); and striae, alone or in conjunction with pulsed dye laser (again, if the striae are erythematous), according to clinical professor of Dermatology at Georgetown University Hospital

 

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