Microneedle RF device improves acne

January 28, 2013

A microneedle radiofrequency (RF) device was as effective for acne vulgaris as a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser, but with less downtime, according to findings from a recent study.

A microneedle radiofrequency (RF) device was as effective for acne vulgaris as a carbon dioxide (CO2) fractional laser, but with less downtime, according to findings from a recent study.

Researchers with Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, examined the results of treatments with the two devices on 20 patients with acne, according to the abstract.

The patients received full-face treatments with the CO2 and RF devices, each undergoing two passes of the CO2 device with a pulse energy setting of 80 mJ and a density of 100 spots/cm on one side. On the other side of the face, patients received two passes of the RF device with an intensity of 8, density of 25 MTZ/cm2 and a depth of 1.5-2.5 mm.

At three months post-treatment, most patients had improved according to clinical and photographic assessments, researchers noted. There were no significant differences between the two devices in patient ratings, physician-measured parameters or intraoperative pain ratings.

Recovery time for the RF device was significantly shorter than that for the CO2 device, however, and thus may be more convenient for patients, study authors concluded.

The study was published in the Journal of Cosmetic and Laser Therapy.