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Discovering Dermatology Times: February

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Article
Dermatology TimesDermatology Times, February 2024 (Vol. 45. No. 02)
Volume 45
Issue 02

Learn more about the in-depth topics covered in the February 2024 print issue of Dermatology Times.

The February issue of Dermatology Times includes a collection of thought-provoking articles and topics ranging from rare disease detection using artificial intelligence to repigmentation of the lips using ruxolitinib Be sure to take a look at highlights from the issue below. Also, don’t miss a moment of Dermatology Times by signing up for our eNewsletters and subscribing to receive the free print issue and supplements each month.

Rare Disease Detection With AI: What Tools to Trust

“Rare Disease Day raises awareness for the 300 million people living with rare diseases around the world and their families and carers. Relatively common symptoms can hide underlying rare diseases, leading to misdiagnosis and [delayed] treatment,” writes the Rare Disease Day organization. Rare Disease Day has been observed globally every year on the last day of February since its creation in 2008. This year, Rare Disease Day is observed on February 29, and it is an opportunity to work toward increased awareness. One of the emerging methods for further studying, analyzing, and detecting rare diseases and their characteristics is through artificial intelligence (AI). Joseph Zabinski, PhD, MEM, the managing director of AI and personalized medicine at OM1, a real-world data, AI, and technology company with a focus on chronic diseases, and Stefan Weiss, MD, MBA, FAAD, the managing director of dermatology at OM1, exclusively share their expertise into AI’s capabilities in dermatology.

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From Conjunctivitis to Itch Control: RAD Research to Keep an Eye on

Several late-breaking research sessions were presented during the recent Revolutionizing Atopic Dermatitis Virtual Conference, showcasing new data in atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment. Here are a few highlights in case you missed it. Matthew Zirwas, MD, of Dermatologists of Greater Columbus in Columbus, Ohio, did a deep dive on dupilumab (Dupixent)-induced conjunctivitis. Dupilumab, known for inhibiting both IL-4 and IL-13, has been associated with conjunctivitis as a comorbidity in AD. The presentation aimed to address questions about the frequency and clinical significance of this adverse event, particularly in patients with AD. Matthew Zirwas, MD, of Dermatologists of Greater Columbus in Columbus, Ohio, did a deep dive on dupilumab (Dupixent)-induced conjunctivitis. Dupilumab, known for inhibiting both IL-4 and IL-13, has been associated with conjunctivitis as a comorbidity in AD. The presentation aimed to address questions about the frequency and clinical significance of this adverse event, particularly in patients with AD.

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I Am Not Being Paid to Treat Actinic Keratoses: How Could That Be?

“Dr Skin” completed his dermatology residency program almost 20 years ago. His successful practice in the Sun Belt serves many young and older patients. Because of the excessive sun exposure seen by many of his patients, 4 of every 10 patients present with a variety of signs of photodamage, many of whom are younger than 65. Most commonly, patients present with myriad actinic keratoses. In an ethical attempt to limit the number of required patient visits, Dr Skin will often treat 20 to 30 actinic keratoses in 1 visit. Unfortunately, as would be expected, such patients continue to contract further actinic keratoses and sometimes reappear in his office every 2 months for treatment. Dr Skin has taken courses on proper coding and codes in a recognized, honest, and ethical manner. Unfortunately, some of his third-party carriers have now informed him that only 15 actinic keratoses can be treated at each visit and only 4 such visits are allowed during a year for each patient.

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Case Report: Repigmentation of the Lips Using Ruxolitinib

Vitiligo is perhaps one of the most universally recognizable skin conditions. Even those who don’t know the name of the condition can recognize its distinct appearance. Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which certain patches of skin lose their pigment, causing well-demarcated white spots on the skin. This occurs when melanocytes are attacked or destroyed and thus stop producing melanin. Although there is still much unknown, there are various theories surrounding the pathogenesis of vitiligo, the most common one being autoimmune destruction by an individual’s body. Vitiligo is the most common depigmentation disorder and affects 0.5% to 2.0% of the world’s population. In May 2023, I met with a 29-year-old African American male patient with Fitzpatrick skin type V with a 6-month reported history of vitiligo on his lips. His vitiligo started off as 1 small patch on his left lower lip, which he first thought nothing of. However, it began spreading throughout the rest of his lower lip as well as his right and left upper lip. He is otherwise healthy, with no other past medical history.

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