Study makes case for renewed interest in carbon dioxide laser resurfacing

August 5, 2008

Ann Arbor, Mich. - New research suggests that a form of laser cosmetic surgery first used two decades ago - but which has since fallen out of favor - could make a comeback in treating facial wrinkles, London’s Daily Mail reports.

Ann Arbor, Mich. - New research suggests that a form of laser cosmetic surgery first used two decades ago - but which has since fallen out of favor - could make a comeback in treating facial wrinkles, London’s Daily Mail reports.

Researchers at the University of Michigan say that carbon dioxide laser resurfacing, which lost favor due to new treatment modalities after being linked with adverse effects such as pigmentation changes, scarring and acne, might deserve another chance as a tool to rejuvenate wrinkles.

Results of the study suggest that most of the side effects clear up within two years, leaving patients with up to 50 percent fewer lines and wrinkles.

The study, which appeared in a recent issue of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, was based on an analysis of 42 women and five men, with an average age of 52, who had undergone facial laser resurfacing between 1996 and 2004. Just over half the subjects experienced complications such as acne, but it disappeared within two years. Following their recovery, the results of their procedures showed significant long-term improvements, including an average 45 per cent reduction in wrinkles.

“Use of the laser allows precise treatment, giving the surgeon more control over the resurfacing procedure than is possible with other treatments such as chemical peels and dermabrasion,” the researchers write.