Emsculpt gets nationally designated week

Jun 25, 2019, 10:17am

What does that mean for providers who offer the body contouring and muscle defining technology? Experts weigh in.

The Emsculpt (BTL) device has its own nationally designated week, the week of May 20, with National Day Calendar.

National Day Calendar is a business that tracks and promotes nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months. Companies and organizations can submit applications to have a designated national day, week or month with NationalDayCalendar.com. National Day Calendar doesn’t quote prices on the phone. Filling out the application is free. If the National Day Calendar committee agrees on featuring a company or organization on the calendar, applicants would pay up to $4,500 for a designated day, according to an article published a few years ago on Marketwatch.com. 

Having a designated day, week or month can boost a product’s or service’s national awareness, according to National Day Calendar.

“… National Day Calendar offers a powerful media mix of digital, radio, social media and television news platforms that reach a hyper-engaged audience of Celebrators across the United States and around the globe,” according to NationalDayCalendar.com. “Over 20,000 media outlets source their stories from National Day Calendar’s website including Fox and Friends, The Today Show, Good Morning America, Jimmy Kimmel, Ellen and Elvis Duran to name only a few. Countless newspapers and bloggers write stories for their publications using information from National Day Calendar and millions view it directly every day.”

BTL hopes National Emsculpt Week will drive annual demand for the device, which noninvasively eliminates fat cells and defines muscle, just in time for the summer kick off.

Competition is high for getting a designated period of time with the National Day Calendar organization, which according to John Ferris, vice president of U.S. Marketing at BTL, approves just 20 national holidays a year but receives more than 30,000 applications.

Did It Work?

Did having a national week impact business at providers’ offices? Dermatology Times posed the question and this is what some providers had to say:

Dermatologist Dendy Engelman, M.D., says this year’s Emsculpt week drove more patients to her practice.

“For National Emsculpt Week we encouraged our current patients to ‘Em(SCULPT)’ their muscles with a friend, which was a great success. We had many new faces in our office, and the best part is that they were driven by friend referrals, which are more trustworthy than any advertisement,” Dr. Engelman tells Dermatology Times. “In addition to driving more patients into our office, current patients who typically come for other aesthetic treatments were intrigued about Emsculpt and all the hype from National Emsculpt Week. As a result, some of our regulars became new Emsculpt patients too. All around, Emsculpt Week was a huge success for driving new patients to the practice.”

Dermatologist Bruce Katz, M.D., performs Emsculpt at his New York City practice. He says that while he and his staff were not aware that there was a national Emsculpt week, he agrees the device is a patient pleaser.

“… it has definitely lived up to all of the hype about it. It is an amazing new technology. Emsculpt is the first time we can actually build and tone muscle while removing fat at the same time. This hasn’t been done before when performing body contouring," Dr. Katz says.

Richard Moore, M.D., an internist who uses Emsculpt at his St. Louis, Mo., men’s health practice, says he saw the promotional material on social media for Emsculpt week but did not see an increase in business as a result of it.

“I think Emsculpt is a terrific body sculpting device but in order to raise consumer awareness it will require a larger marketing effort to educate potential clients about its benefits,” Dr. Moore says.

New York City dermatologist Adarsh Vijay Mudgil, M.D., an Emsculpt provider, also didn’t see an uptick in inquiries during Emsculpt week but tells Dermatology Times that having such a designation is an opportunity to create a buzz that could take weeks or months to manifest. Dr. Mudgil is another Emsculpt fan.

“This is great for building abs, buttocks, thighs and biceps. This is an ideal treatment for patients who are not ideal candidates for current body sculpting procedures like CoolSculpting (Allergan),” Dr. Mudgil says.

Emsculpt uses High-Intensity Focused Electromagnetic technology to induce about 20,000 supramaximal muscle contractions during each 30-minute session. Treatment results in a 16% average increase in muscle mass. Providers can use the device to treat the abdominals and buttocks, as well as arms and legs with a small device applicator, according to BTL.

Emsculpt treatment has an 86% Worth It rating on RealSelf as of June 11, 2019.

Disclosures:

: Drs. Moore and Mudgi report no relevant disclosures. Dr. Katz was an investigator for Emsculpt. Dr. Engelman has consulted for BTL but doesn’t actively consult on behalf of Emsculpt.