Botulinum toxin shots ineffective for weight loss

February 5, 2013

Gastric botulinum toxin injections are ineffective for body weight loss, according to a recent study.

 

Gastric botulinum toxin injections are ineffective for body weight loss, according to a recent study.

Researchers with Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., analyzed the results of botulinum toxin type A injections in 60 obese patients in a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients received botulinum toxin doses of 100 units, 300 units, 500 units, or placebo. The injections slowed the progression of food through the stomach, but were ineffective for reducing body weight, investigators found.

Investigators tracked gastric emptying of solids, body weight, satiation, calorie intake and psychological aspects of eating behavior. Two weeks after botulinum toxin injections, gastric emptying increased by 0.8, 14, 24 and 14 minutes among the patients given placebo, 100 U, 300 U and 500 U, respectively. At 16 weeks after injections, mean body weights dropped by 2.2, 0.2, 2.3 and 3.0 kg in those groups, respectively.

“Gastric antral injections of BTA may delay gastric emptying at a dose of 300 U but do not cause early satiety, altered eating behaviors or loss of body weight,” study authors concluded.

The study was published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Heptology.