Aging population drives Rx dermatological drug growth

April 1, 2006

New York ? The prescription dermatological drug market is predicted to have sales jump from $8.4 billion in 2005 to $11.1 billion by 2010, according to a new study from market research firm Kalorama Information, a division of MarketResearch.com, a provider of industry-specific market research reports.

New York - The prescription dermatological drug market is predicted to have sales jump from $8.4 billion in 2005 to $11.1 billion by 2010, according to a new study from market research firm Kalorama Information, a division of MarketResearch.com, a provider of industry-specific market research reports.

The Worldwide Market for Prescription Dermatological Drugs Study cites the aging of the world population and "a focus on lifestyle treatments that revitalize youthfulness and stave off skin damage" as driving forces behind the growth.

Market trends

The anti-aging and photodamage, fungal infection treatment, hair loss and hair removal, skin cancer, treatments and miscellaneous dermatology drug sectors showed the most dramatic gains during this period with growth rates between 7.2 percent and 19 percent, according to Mary Anne Crandall, R.N., the author of the final report.

While sales of prescription acne, rosacea, dermatitis, seborrhea and hyperpigmentation/melasma products have continued to perform well - although with slower growth rates in the last five years as many of these drugs are older or have lost patent protection - the overall market has been bolstered by recent trends in "cosmeceuticals," a favorite among aging baby boomers.

"The aging population is better educated and wants to see results - whether they have wrinkles, skin cancer or psoriasis. Today's consumers are savvy to innovative dermatological treatments, derma drug delivery developments and new prescription drug information which is widely available on the Internet," Ms. Crandall notes.

The anti-aging and photodamage segment will be driven by consumer demands for products that reduce the signs of aging such as wrinkles and imperfections of the skin, Ms. Crandall tells Dermatology Times. Psoriasis growth will reflect new approvals of products in the biological area. Skin cancer will also see consumer demand as a driving force due to an increasing number of cases reported each year and new advancements in technology.

In the report, Ms. Crandall also notes a trend toward a shortage of dermatologists.

"As more dermatologists retire, there are not a lot of medical students following in their footsteps. This is a trend where the whole country is concerned," she says.

Overall effect

Another major trend is the effect cosmetic dermatology has on dermatology practices as a whole.

"There is a real division in cosmetic dermatology because the older dermatologists do not necessarily want to practice cosmetic dermatology and they are doing it mainly because their patients want them to. While younger dermatologists are more interested in cosmetic dermatology, there are often very few of them," Ms. Crandall explains.

"There is a situation brewing with regard to the number of dermatologists and what the public wants dermatologists to do. I think you are going to find that the public is going to go elsewhere if they can't get the services they want through their dermatologists," she says.

More report details

"The fifth edition of The Worldwide Market for Prescription Dermatological Drugs re-evaluates the global prescription dermatological drug market and includes a comprehensive look at a variety of skin disorders with a focus on market share, key trends and innovations, demographics, epidemiology and geographic breakdowns," Ms. Crandall says.

Interviews with industry participants, clinicians and regulators, market information for the years 2000 to 2010 and analysis are included in the current report. The focus year 2005 is used for competitive analysis.

The report also gives an overview and product descriptions of general therapy segments, including prescription drugs to treat: