Lured to learn

December 1, 2007
Lisette Hilton

Lisette Hilton is president of Words Come Alive, based in Boca Raton, Florida.

Hubert (Hugh) V. Moss, M.D., acted on his conviction that continuing education matters when he endowed a lectureship, the Hubert and Mary Moss Lectureship, in the department of dermatology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wis.

The endowment culminated many years of working toward offering doctors opportunities to learn. The general dermatologist started nearly 20 years ago to sponsor annual lectures for dermatologists and other physicians in Wisconsin - reaching into his own pocket to invite speakers from around the United States. When he retired from practice and academia in 2000, he put his own money into a fund which supports these lectures for the long term with the interest that it generates.

Dr. Moss says he learned to keep the lecture topics practical, so that attendees would apply what they had learned to clinical practice.

"I asked all my speakers to speak on clinical practice, rather than emphasizing research, although certainly many were excellent researchers. We usually would have two talks - one would be clinical and one basic research," Dr. Moss tells Dermatology Times.

While Dr. Moss' original financial contribution continues to fund the annual Hubert and Mary Moss Lectureship, Dr. Moss has turned over responsibilities for running the lectures to George Reizner, M.D., professor of dermatology at the University of Wisconsin.

"Dr. Gary Wood, who is chairman of dermatology at University of Wisconsin, has supported this program so that it could and continues to flourish," he says.

Dr. Moss, who has attended every one of the lectures, continues to keep up with his personal quest for learning nearly eight years into retirement.

"I attend the grand rounds for the University of Wisconsin department of dermatology," he says. "I also donate my time to giving dermatologic care at a free clinic in Madison."

The clinic work has been yet another learning experience, Dr. Moss says.

"The patients that I am serving have no insurance. It's a free clinic for patients with no medical insurance," he says.

The clinic work, which he does once or twice a month, keeps him doing what he enjoys most about his career - working with patients. But the clinic is a more relaxed setting than when he had his practice, Dr. Moss says.

"You can take your time, and do not feel like you have to see a certain number of patients in a given period of time. It is very gratifying. I just enjoy people and enjoy working with them in my field," he says.

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