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Derm In The News: March 24-30

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Article

Keep up with the latest headlines in dermatology from the past week, including the discovery of a gene mutation that may cause psoriasis, the role of skin biopsies in detecting Parkinson's disease, and more.

UPI: Researchers identify gene mutation that causes psoriasis

Australian researchers at the Australian National University have identified a gene mutation, IKBKB, responsible for triggering psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. By studying a mouse model, they discovered that this mutation affects regulatory T-cells, causing them to misfire and promote inflammation, ultimately leading to disease onset. The researchers hope that their findings will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment options, potentially paving the way for a cure in the future.

Harvard Crimson: Harvard Neurologists Find Skin Biopsies Can Detect Parkinson’s Disease in Recent Study

A team of neurologists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, affiliated with Harvard, discovered that skin biopsies can predict early signs of four progressive neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, by detecting an abnormal protein called alpha-synuclein up to 2 decades before symptoms appear. Led by professors Christopher H. Gibbons and Roy L. Freeman, the study revealed that skin biopsies could detect alpha-synuclein in a high percentage of patients with Parkinson's, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Despite not yet being able to differentiate between specific neurological disorders, the biopsy method offers a minimally invasive means of identifying individuals at risk for these diseases.

Yahoo Finance: Integrated Dermatology Appoints Nationally Renowned Healthcare Leader Tushar Ramani, MD as CEO

Integrated Dermatology, the largest independent dermatology provider in the US, recently appointed Tushar Ramani, MD, a leader with clinical expertise as a former anesthesiologist and entrepreneurial success in healthcare service companies, as its new CEO. Ramani's strategic vision involves expanding the company's dermatology partner network, implementing new technologies, and driving innovation while maintaining high-quality dermatology care. Ramani, with over 30 years of health care experience, expresses excitement about leading Integrated Dermatology and aligning with its mission to optimize partner dermatologists' practices and deliver exceptional patient care nationwide.

Dell Medical School: Ammar Ahmed: Practicing What We Teach

Ammar Ahmed, MD, FAAD, has had a significant impact on dermatology education and patient care in Austin over the past decade, according to a feature from Dell Medical School. As one of the earliest faculty members in the city's first academic dermatology program, he became the director of Dell Med’s Dermatology Residency and led the design of the school’s dermatology curriculum. Beyond academia, Ahmed provides care through Ascension Seton and directs the dermatology service for CommUnityCare Health Centers, while also conducting national work with the American Academy of Dermatology. His focus extends to vitiligo research and treatment, aiming to expand access to care through innovative approaches, including grafting procedures and collaboration with biotech startups and device companies.

The New York Times: Are Teenagers Obsessing Too Much About Skin Care?

The New York Times reports a surge in younger customers frequenting beauty stores like Sephora and Ulta, seeking adult acne and anti-aging skin care products. Alexandra D’Amour’s guest essay delves into the concerning trend of teenagers, influenced by social media, adopting elaborate skin care routines and fears of premature aging, coined as "Sephora Kids."

Have you seen any dermatology headlines this week that we may have missed? Share with us by emailing our team at DTEditor@mmhgroup.com.

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